A better walk: Training dogs not to lunge, growl, and pull on a leash

Leash training is essential for both dogs and their owners. Not only is it a part of good dog etiquette, but a leash-trained dog will be safer and more comfortable out for walks. Not all dogs adjust easily to leashes, however, and when a dog refuses to walk or pulls on the leash, there are several tricks that can help correct that behavior.

Get my list of 6 training techniques you can use to help your dog to stop pulling on leash.

Traditionally, dogs have been taught to pull by putting them on leash and guiding them through the act. Unfortunately, problems abound at a competition where a dog must complete his pulls off-lead. Fortunately, lends itself well to teaching the dog without guides or props! The clicker can be used to mark the specific behaviors we want to encourage, such as a low head or digging into the substrate. Behaviors that we don’t want to see in the chute, such as barking, spinning, and jumping, are ignored. Much of the initial clicker training for weight pull can be done in the backyard, or even indoors on carpet.

How to Stop Your Dog From Pulling on Leash | FernDog Training

Let’s take a look at 3 of the most commonly used methods for training your dog to stop pulling on the leash. , is the head trainer for her businesses, , located in Smithfield, RI, and , servicing eastern Massachusetts. An avid dog agility competitor, she also competes in conformation, obedience, rally, and weight pull. When not trialing with her own dogs, Katherine inspires the next generation of dog trainers by helping out at regional 4-H clubs.

Dog Training for Humans - Stop Pulling on the Lead! | Udemy

Leash training is essential for both dogs and their owners. Not only is it a part of good dog etiquette, but a leash-trained dog will be safer and more comfortable out for walks. Not all dogs adjust easily to leashes, however, and when a dog refuses to walk or pulls on the leash, there are several tricks that can help correct that behavior.Choose the Right Leash and CollarBefore leash training can begin, it is important to have the right collar and leash. The collar should fit snugly but not tightly around the dog's neck, without chafing or pinching. Harnesses are not recommended when leash training, since a dog's pulling power is in its chest, and it will be harder to correct inappropriate behavior with a harness.The leash should be long enough to allow some slack, but not so long that the dog has free movement over a large range. Longer leashes can be introduced after training, but until the dog has learned proper leash manners, a length of 4-6 feet is best.Both the collar and leash should be in good condition without any fraying or damage that could break under unexpected pressure. The clip connecting the collar and leash should be firm and secure, and the collar and leash should be wiped clean as often as necessary so no dirt can build up that could cause irritation to the dog.Correcting Walking ProblemsThere are many reasons why dogs may pull on a leash or resist walking. If the dog has not been leash trained before, the sight, smell and feel of the leash and collar could be frightening or make the dog nervous, which can lead to resistance or balking. A dog that has been cooped up may be overly excited to go out on the leash, which can lead to more pulling or ignoring commands. Similarly, if dogs are interested in nearby items, they may be more likely to pull, or if there is something in their sight that scares them, they may resist walking.Once you understand why a dog may have problems walking on the leash, there are several techniques that can encourage proper behavior…For the best training, combine several techniques to continually reinforce your dog's behavior. Always be patient with your pet, and in time you both will enjoy hassle-free walks.

The Homestead Helper: Training Your Dog To Pull | Off The Grid News