The Science of Dog Training: Is It Okay To Use A Shock Collar?

This study investigated the welfare consequences of training dogs in the field with manually operated electronic devices (e-collars). Following a preliminary study on 9 dogs, 63 pet dogs referred for recall related problems were assigned to one of three Groups: Treatment Group A were trained by industry approved trainers using e-collars; Control Group B trained by the same trainers but without use of e-collars; and Group C trained by members of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers, UK again without e-collar stimulation (n = 21 for each Group). Dogs received two 15 minute training sessions per day for 4–5 days. Training sessions were recorded on video for behavioural analysis. Saliva and urine were collected to assay for cortisol over the training period. During preliminary studies there were negative changes in dogs' behaviour on application of electric stimuli, and elevated cortisol post-stimulation. These dogs had generally experienced high intensity stimuli without pre-warning cues during training. In contrast, in the subsequent larger, controlled study, trainers used lower settings with a pre-warning function and behavioural responses were less marked. Nevertheless, Group A dogs spent significantly more time tense, yawned more often and engaged in less environmental interaction than Group C dogs. There was no difference in urinary corticosteroids between Groups. Salivary cortisol in Group A dogs was not significantly different from that in Group B or Group C, though Group C dogs showed higher measures than Group B throughout sampling. Following training 92% of owners reported improvements in their dog's referred behaviour, and there was no significant difference in reported efficacy across Groups. Owners of dogs trained using e-collars were less confident of applying the training approach demonstrated. These findings suggest that there is no consistent benefit to be gained from e-collar training but greater welfare concerns compared with positive reward based training.

Electronic Collars vs Traditional Leashes for Exercising Dogs on Town Streets—a Cause of Debate in One Small Town in Missouri

Behavioural data were collected by the research team on hand held video cameras before, during and after the exposure to the electric stimulation. Six of the 8 dogs referred for sheep chasing only engaged in one or two approaches, and received a single application of the electric stimulus each time they approached sheep, which led to a cessation of approach. One dog referred for sheep chasing did not approach sheep during the training sessions, but received two stimuli at points when it was orientated towards nearby sheep. One dog received 5 exposures to e-collar stimuli before approaches ceased. As dogs were relatively free to roam open fields during training, video operators chose to position themselves where they could have best view of dogs when in proximity to sheep. As a consequence, it was not possible to have full video records of the entire training period, but good records were made of the period immediately before and immediately after approach to sheep and exposure to electronic stimulation.

Electric Dog Collars | Dog Training Collars - Cabela's

The introduction of electronic, or 'shock' collars for the training of dogs has been. In the hands of an expert, many dogs can learn to consistently trot by one's side -- even in the face of major distractions. For most owners, however, this is not likely to occur. There are several reasons for this. First, the dog has to be taught to stay next to you -- and do so at all times. For the collar to work, the owner must be able to give the shock right when the dog starts getting ahead, falling behind or walking too far to the side -- even after the dog knows the heel behavior. For instance, if the dog sees a buddy and starts to run off to greet him, the owners must deliver the shock immediately as he starts, not one or two seconds later. That means that the owner must always be holding the electronic collar with finger on the delivery button, or the dog will know that sometimes he has at least two to four second window to do something a human might consider naughty. And if the owner cannot deliver the shock at the very start of the dog's running off, the dog is not learning that running off is the problem. In the dog's mind, he is being punished for whatever he is doing at that exact moment he receives the shock.

Dog Shock Collar – The Good and The Bad - Shiba Shake

Unfortunately, there are a lot of sub-standard shock collars on the market. Do your research. Ask for recommendations from other dog owners and experts. A poor quality electronic collar can be unreliable or malfunction, and ultimately very dangerous to dogs.

Train dogs and stop problem dog behaviors